Imperfekt – Past Tense in German Grammar

Introduction

The past tense, also called simple past or imperfect (Imperfekt or Präteritum in German), is used to express facts and actions that started and ended in the past. It is typically used to tell stories or report past events in written German. In spoken language, it is common to use the perfect tense instead of the past tense. We can use the English simple past to translate this tense.

Master German tenses online with Lingolia’s simple online grammar explanations and exercises. Learn what the past tense is, when to use it and how to conjugate weak (regular), strong and mixed (irregular) verbs.

Example

Im letzten Jahr machte ich Urlaub in Deutschland.

Mit dem Fahrrad fuhr ich auf dem Elbe-Radweg von Hamburg bis Dresden. Die Strecke war fantastisch und ich hatte tolles Wetter.

Advertisement

Usage

There are two ways to use the past tense in German, we can use it to express:

  • a completed action in the past
    Example:
    Im letzten Jahr machte ich Urlaub in Deutschland.Last year I went on holiday in Germany.
    Mit dem Fahrrad fuhr ich von Hamburg bis Dresden.I rode my bicycle from Hamburg to Dresden.
  • a fact or condition in the past
    Example:
    Die Strecke war fantastisch und ich hatte tolles Wetter.The route was fantastic and I had great weather.

The past tense in spoken German

In everyday spoken German, it’s more common to use the present perfect to talk about the past.

Example:
Im letzten Jahr habe ich Urlaub in Deutschland gemacht. Mit dem Fahrrad bin ich auf dem Elbe-Radweg von Hamburg bis Dresden gefahren.

However, we still use the simple past of the verbs sein/haben to describe facts and conditions in the past.

Example:
Die Strecke war fantastisch und ich hatte tolles Wetter.

Conjugation of German Verbs in Past Tense

To conjugate verbs in the simple past, we remove the infinitive ending -en and add the following endings:

personweak verbsstrong/mixed verbs
1st person singular (ich) -te ich lernte ich sah
2nd person singular (du) -test du lerntest -st du sahst
3rd person singular (er/sie/es/man) -te er lernte er sah
1st person plural (wir) -ten wir lernten -en wir sahen
2nd person plural (ihr) -tet ihr lerntet -t ihr saht
3rd person plural/polite form (sie/Sie) -ten sie lernten -en sie sahen

The verbs sein/haben are irregular. They are especially important in the simple past:

personseinhaben
1st person singular (ich) ich war ich hatte
2nd person singular (du) du warst du hattest
3rd person singular (er/sie/es/man) er war er hatte
1st person plural (wir) wir waren wir hatten
2nd person plural (ihr) ihr wart ihr hattet
3rd person plural/polite form (sie/Sie) sie waren sie hatten

Exceptions

  • Many strong/mixed (irregular) verbs change the word stem in the simple past. (see list of strong and mixed verbs)
    Example:
    gehen – ging, bringen – brachteto go – went, to bring – brought
  • If the word stem of a strong verb ends in s/ß/z, we either leave off the ending s, or we add an extra e.
    Example:
    lesen – las – du last/du lasestto read – read – you read
  • If the word stem ends in d/t, we add an e before the ending for endings that begin with t/st.
    Example:
    landen – ich landete, du landetest, er landete, wir landeten, …to land – I/you/he/we landed...
    bitten – ich bat, du batest, …, ihr batetto request – I/you/.../you (plural) requested
  • If the word stem of a strong verb ends in ie, there is no ending e in the 1st/3rd person plural.
    Example:
    schreien – ich schrie, wir/sie schrien (not: schriee, schrieen)to scream – I/we/they screamed